Melbourne-based Zero Latency raise $7million for VR expansion

Zero Latency is shaping up as one of the great Aussie VR success stories. The Melbourne-based company has just raised another $7 million in venture capital funding to power...

Zero Latency is shaping up as one of the great Aussie VR success stories. The Melbourne-based company has just raised another $7 million in venture capital funding to power their expansion interstate and internationally. Zero Latency is VR done differently, its not the solitary at-home experience most companies are aiming at, instead this gets you and your friends to a physical location (read massive warehouse) and delivers laser tag on drugs experience.

As a player you get strapped into a portable Oculus Rift (currently using DK2) where your physical movements in space correlate to the virtual experience playing out in front of your eyes. Recently they’re begun working with Alienware backpack PCs to allow for more powerful experiences while remaining untethered.

What initially started as a crowd-funded hacked together experience, has quickly grown in just 3 years into a fully fledged company that is attracting serious funding. What they’ve built here is a platform that can be deployed for a wide variety of entertainment experiences like killing zombies etc, but would also translate remarkably well into police or military training simulations.

If you’re anywhere close to 22-32 Steel St, North Melbourne, Victoria, or are looking for something new and different to do over the Christmas break, you need to go visit Zero Latency. It costs $88 per person which is definitely more expensive than Timezone, but its an experience you can’t get and certainly won’t forget any time soon.

The VC investment comes partly from the original investors Carthona, who are chipping in a cool $2.7 million, while also attracting new money from ASX-listed Thorney Investment Group, Contango Asset Management and Regal Funds Management.

More information at roadtovr.com

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