Taylor Swift just arm wrestled Apple into submission

Taylor Swift wrote an open letter to Apple explaining that her popular 1989 album would never be on Apple Music because of unfair terms. The new service made a...

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Taylor Swift wrote an open letter to Apple explaining that her popular 1989 album would never be on Apple Music because of unfair terms. The new service made a deal with labels that meant artists would give their music away for a 3-month trial period to draw music fans to the service, away from competitors like Spotify, Rdio and Tidal.

Tay Tay was having none of that, explaining in an open letter to Apple, that artists deserve to get paid and if they want to make music available for free as part of a commercial business decision that ultimately benefits them, that Apple should fit the bill. The company has now announced, through senior vice president, Internet Software and Services, Eddie Cue.

Posting on Twitter, he says,

I have to give big props to the power of Swifty here, it’s extremely rare for an individual artist (even those with 52 Million followers) to have a profound impact on one of the largest companies on the planet. In her letter she expressed that she was fighting not for herself, who is doing just fine financially, but for the startup artists who deserve to be paid for there work and not be told to give their music away for free.

Imagine you were an indie artist, launching new music into the world and the most profitible part of the sales chart fell right in the free induction period from Apple. By the time you’re due to make money from the sales, they’ve dropped to almost nothing and you missed the spike that was going to pay for your island, or worse, your next album.

Congrats, Taylor 1 – Apple – 0.

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