Sony first to bring a 4K TV to Australia

Sony’s brand new 84" 4K TV is four times the resolution of your existing TV, that’s 3840 x 2160 pixels. With so much detail, you can now sit closer...

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Sony’s brand new 84" 4K TV is four times the resolution of your existing TV, that’s 3840 x 2160 pixels. With so much detail, you can now sit closer to the TV and don’t need to push the couch back. At this size, you’re unlikely to find a wall-mount for it, but the bigger problem may be fitting it through your front door.

There’s no pricing announced for this monster just yet, but being the largest Sony has ever released, expect it to be north of $5k. It is fantastic to see that 4K TV’s are now a reality and will reach the living rooms of consumers. As more manufacturers enter the market with 4K, prices will drop significantly and increase affordability.

Even if you find the cash in your couch cushions, the biggest issue right now is that there’s almost no content for it. Right now about the only way to get 4K video is with a fat internet connection and a visit to YouTube’s 4K videos. A standard for 4K distribution is still not yet settled.

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Sony’s 4K TV is IP connected for smart apps and is also controllable by mobile phones and tablets. Sony also announced a 4K receiver (STRDA5800ES) with an integrated 4-port network hub at the rear for all you’re connected devices. Your existing devices today only put out 1080p, expect this to be up scaled like SD to HD, HD to 4K. They’ll connect to one of the 8 HDMI-in ports and then one of the 3 HDMI out ports will go to the TV.

With 4 times the resolution of 1080p, it has the potential to become your megawall and display 4 different video streams at once. No word on wether picture-in-picture has evolved to allow this, but we can hope. The other alternative would be to use smart apps in conjunction with your video stream. For example, a content-aware twitter feed down the side of the panel would be a great use of the extra space.

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This post is authored by techAU staffers. Used rarely and sparingly when the source decided to keep their identity secret, or a guest author who isn't seeking credit.
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