VB and Linfox start electric truck deliveries as transport revolution accelerates

One of Australia’s most famous beers, Victoria Bitter is going green, with the Big Cold Beer to be delivered across  Melbourne via electric vehicle from today.  VB now start...

One of Australia’s most famous beers, Victoria Bitter is going green, with the Big Cold Beer to be delivered across  Melbourne via electric vehicle from today. 

VB now start to be transported in a new Volvo FL all electric truck, the first-ever electric vehicle in the Linfox fleet. And it will be the first of  many Linfox electric vehicles that deliver Victoria Bitter as electric vehicle  production ramps up worldwide. 

The VB truck is the first mass-produced electric truck of its size in Australia and one of  over 50 Volvo FL all-electric trucks delivered globally to date. 

It will deliver beer like a regular diesel truck but in a sustainable way: transporting 100,000+ cans and stubbies each week from Asahi Beverages’ distribution centre in  Melbourne’s west to bottle shops and beer lovers across the city. 

In another boost for sustainability, the truck will be powered entirely by 100% offset  solar power drawn from Asahi Beverages’ solar farm near Mildura in northern  Victoria. The truck is the latest sustainability initiative from VB, which has been  brewed with 100% offset solar electricity since last year. 

Group CEO of Asahi Beverages, which purchased Carlton & United Breweries last  year, Robert Iervasi said

“Linfox has delivered VB for more than 50 years. It’s fitting  these two Australian icons are taking this major step towards a sustainable future  together. 

This truck will deliver VB and our other beers in a sustainable, safe and efficient way,  which makes sound commercial sense. 

It is the first of many electric trucks that will deliver our beer. Transitioning our  deliveries to electric vehicles will help us achieve our ambitious sustainability goals of  reducing our net carbon emissions across our entire supply chain by 30% by 2030  and to zero by 2050.” 

The VB truck is decked out in the famous VB green and can travel up to 250km before it needs recharging. 

Linfox delivers hundreds of millions of litres of beer annually for Asahi Beverages. 

“Australia’s domestic freight task has  doubled in the past decade and will continue to grow. To meet this demand,  Australia’s road fleet will also grow and it is essential the fleet does this safely,  efficiently and with reduced environmental impact.

We are proud to introduce Volvo’s first electric vehicle in Australia to the Linfox  fleet. The majority of Linfox’s carbon emissions come from transportation tasks. As we  continue our journey to act sustainably and achieve zero net emissions by 2030, the  way we operate will change in response, with more electric vehicles planned for our  fleet and increased use of rail transport where viable. 

Together with our customers, we continue our commitment to build sustainable and reliable supply chains for the future.” 

Linfox Executive Chairman Peter Fox

“The transport industry  is transforming at a rapid rate. Electromobility is rapidly gaining traction as a transport solution and we are proud to  partner with Linfox and Asahi Beverages on this exciting new journey.” 

Environmental care is a core value shared not only by Linfox and Volvo Trucks, but  also by Asahi Beverages and we are proud of those shared values. We are committed to ensuring our vehicles will play their part in making our cities  cleaner and more liveable.

This new truck represents the first step on that journey.”

Volvo Group Australia President and CEO Martin Merrick
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Vehicles

Creator of techAU, Jason has spent the dozen+ years covering technology in Australia and around the world. Bringing a background in multimedia and passion for technology to the job, Cartwright delivers detailed product reviews, event coverage and industry news on a daily basis. Disclaimer: Tesla Shareholder from 20/01/2021
One Comment

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  • Simon
    9 July 2021 at 9:00 am

    250km seems pretty limiting. Even local metro delivery trucks will often do 300-500km in a day, but I guess this is a step in the right direction.

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