Woolworths are using electric trucks

The future of transport is electric and while many thought heavy vehicles  would never make the transition, this Aussie-built EV truck is proof that’s wrong. Woolworths is one company...

The future of transport is electric and while many thought heavy vehicles  would never make the transition, this Aussie-built EV truck is proof that’s wrong.

Woolworths is one company that is trialing the EV technology. Transiting groceries around the country currently relies on lots of diesel powered trucks running between distribution centers and supermarkets, so if they can make EV work, there’s some savings to be had, as well as reducing their carbon emissions as a company. 

The fully electric truck features technology from SeaElectric, who have developed an electric drivetrain, known as SEA-Drive. They have a number of variants, like this IVECO ACCO, built in Australia, so no Australian manufacturing isn’t dead. 

The company recently posted an earlier photo of the truck before it received Woolworths branding and detailed the specs of the truck. This is powered by electricity 100% of the time that you’ll soon seeing much more of on Melbourne roads.

The SEA-Drive 140 model has been created for adoption by 14t to 17t cab chassis trucks. A 195kW (continuous power) Permanent Magnet motor, provides 2060Nm of continuous torque, drives the vehicle, allowing 0-50km/h in 8 seconds.

It operates with a 140kWh battery pack, mounted below the cab and between the chassis rails for protection and balance. This configuration gets up to 180km on a charge, but Woolworths needed more, so opted for the extra battery pack.

With an additional battery module, that power is increased to 212kWh, that’s like having 2x Tesla Model S’ bolted together to deliver a ridiculous 3500Nm from the electric motor. It’s that kind of torque that’s required to haul the weight found in transport.

A 22kW integrated charger allows full charge in under 7 hours.

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