Australian EV choices in 2019 are growing rapidly

2019 is a great year for electric vehicles in Australia. After almost a decade of EVs in the country, the number of entrants is exploding with EVs now a...

2019 is a great year for electric vehicles in Australia. After almost a decade of EVs in the country, the number of entrants is exploding with EVs now a seriously viable option for your next vehicle.

The biggest determiner of which vehicle you buy differs greatly based on your personal preferences and circumstances. Some people prioritise price over everything, while others have a minimum range in mind for an EV to be practical in their lives.

Below is the list of available EVs in Australia in 2019, ordered in various ways to enable a quick and easy decision.

The latest entrant in the EV space will be the 2nd-gen Nissan Leaf when it goes on sale from the start of August. The Leaf won’t have long in the market before facing some serious competition with the Tesla Model 3 SR+ and Performance variants also launching in August.

With the rollout of fast charging locations across the country (mainly the east coast) most daily commutes and weekend road trips are now viable with EVs. The amount of flexibility and planning you need to put in for longer trips is a direct result of the range available on a single charge, combined with the charging infrastructure along that route.

Chargefox is rapidly changing that equation thanks to a network of 22 ultra-rapid charging locations which can inject power at up to 350kWh. While charging standards on EVs have typically been a nightmare, these dual-connector chargers (made by QLD company Tritium) allow up to 400km of range in just 15minutes, as long as the car can take it.

Ordered by Price (Lowest to highest)

ModelPrices FromBattery SizeRated RangeFast Charging type
Hyundai IONIQ EV$44,99028 kWh230kmCCS Type 2
Renault Zoe$47,49040 kWh300kmType 2 (Mennekes)
Nissan Leaf (gen 2)$54,48240 kWh270kmCHAdeMO
Hyundai Kona$59,99064 kWh449kmType 2 (Mennekes)
BMW i3$68,70033 kWh260kmType 2 (Mennekes)
Tesla Model 3 SR+$72,81850 kWh 460kmCCS Type 2
Tesla Model 3 Performance$96,51075 kWh560kmCCS Type 2
Tesla Model S$124,961 75 kWh565kmType 2 (Mennekes)
Jaguar I-Pace$119,00090 kWh470kmCHAdeMO
Tesla Model X$136,334100 kWh594kmType 2 (Mennekes)

EVs ordered by range (highest to lowest)

ModelPrices FromBattery SizeRated RangeFast Charging type
Tesla Model X $136,334 100 kWh594kmType 2 (Mennekes)
Tesla Model S$124,96175 kWh565kmType 2 (Mennekes)
Tesla Model 3 Performance$96,51075 kWh560kmCCS Type 2
Jaguar I-Pace$119,00090 kWh470kmCHAdeMO
Tesla Model 3 SR+$72,81850 kWh 460kmCCS Type 2
Hyundai Kona$59,99064 kWh449kmType 2 (Mennekes)
Renault Zoe$47,49040 kWh300kmType 2 (Mennekes)
Nissan Leaf (gen 2)$54,48240 kWh270kmCHAdeMO
BMW i3$68,70033 kWh260kmType 2 (Mennekes)
Hyundai IONIQ EV$44,99028 kWh230kmCCS Type 2

EVs ordered by fast charging type

ModelPrices FromBattery SizeRated RangeFast Charging type
Hyundai IONIQ EV$44,99028 kWh230kmCCS Type 2
Tesla Model 3 SR+$72,81850 kWh 460kmCCS Type 2
Tesla Model 3 Performance$96,51075 kWh560kmCCS Type 2
Nissan Leaf (gen 2)$54,48240 kWh270kmCHAdeMO
Jaguar I-Pace$119,00090 kWh470kmCHAdeMO
Renault Zoe$47,49040 kWh300kmType 2 (Mennekes)
Hyundai Kona$59,99064 kWh449kmType 2 (Mennekes)
BMW i3$68,70033 kWh260kmType 2 (Mennekes)
Tesla Model S $124,96175 kWh565kmType 2 (Mennekes)
Tesla Model X $136,334 100 kWh594kmType 2 (Mennekes)

As good fast as the EV landscape in Australia is changing, we are behind the rest of the world. Having a competitive market of affordable EVs available to buy in Australia is ultimately a great thing for consumers and the planet.

We can expect the number of EVs on sale to continue to grow through 2020 and beyond including the Audio E-tron, Mercedes EQC, Volkswagen ID.3, Polestar 1 and 2, Porsche Taycan, Rivian 4WD/Ute and many more.

The current estimates put ICE and EV price crossover somewhere around 2025, so the best time to buy is really a personal decision, based on price, range, performance and features.

If you want in early, like most things, you’ll pay an early adopters tax (not literally, but a EVs are still a premium price) for the privilege. Sales of EVs now encourages automakers to ship global products to Australia and traditionally we have done well as a country in terms of early adoption.

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Creator of techAU, Jason has spent the dozen+ years covering technology in Australia and around the world. Bringing a background in multimedia and passion for technology to the job, Cartwright delivers detailed product reviews, event coverage and industry news on a daily basis.
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