Aussie Xbox One doesn’t come with Guide or IR blaster

So it’s been a big day in Australia with the arrival of the first of the next generation consoles, the Xbox One. The highly anticipated console had a massive...

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So it’s been a big day in Australia with the arrival of the first of the next generation consoles, the Xbox One. The highly anticipated console had a massive lineup of new features and one of the most ambitious was the HDMI-IN port which proposed the notion of never having to switch HDMI inputs again.

Connecting a set top box or DVR (in my case a TIVO), would become just an app on the Xbox One. This allows you to very rapidly switch between live TV and gaming for example. HDMI in is a very rarely seen on devices other than video capture cards, so for Microsoft to include it on a mainstream console is a big deal.

With TV input, Microsoft also wanted to re-invent the TV guide, combining both OTA channel data with channels created from on-demand apps and even slideshows form places like SkyDrive. This all sounds very next gen and incredibly exciting, something that clearly sets it apart from main rival Sony, with their PS4 set to launch next week.

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The problem is that Australian’s who want to use the feature can’t. Not only is there no ‘Advanced IR blasters’ included in the Xbox One day one console, the guide doesn’t work at all. This is a major disappointment and needs to be fixed now. To advertise and promote a feature  of the device, then not deliver it at launch is kind of unacceptable, especially without a launch date listed for Australia.

What I can tell you is that you can connect a HDMI input, in my case a TiVo and get TV to your Xbox One. On that level, it works, but if you want to change channel, you’ll need to put down the controller and pickup the TiVo remote. That’s a pretty broke system.

For now, enjoy a gallery of images of the Xbox One arrive at techAU, sorry Xbox 360.. there’s a new king in town.

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This post is authored by techAU staffers. Used rarely and sparingly when the source decided to keep their identity secret, or a guest author who isn’t seeking credit.