Tindo Solar scores $1M to support $5.3M investment in local solar innovation and production

Tindo Solar is one of the rare Aussie businesses that are actually making solar panels in our country. Most of the 3/4 of Australian homes that have solar, have panels...

Tindo Solar is one of the rare Aussie businesses that are actually making solar panels in our country. Most of the 3/4 of Australian homes that have solar, have panels that came from overseas (mostly China). A new round of funding under the Government’s Manufacturing Modernisation Fund, will see Tindo Solar receive $1 million for its state-of-the-art solar panel production facility.

The $1 million grant will the company to transition their manufacturing line to new M10 cell technology and boost production capacity. This responds to growing demand for locally produced panels and a new 144-cell 550W module is set to be among the first modules to roll off the new line.

It is expected to fund up to 60 jobs and the federal support will form part of an overall investment of $5,302,777 in the South Australian company.

Tindo says they are expecting to release their new modules in Q1 2022.

Tindo CEO Shayne Jaenisch told PV Magazine:

“We’re looking forward to being able to take the next step. It allows us to compete at the front end of technology.

Once we bring the new line into production in January I think we’ll be able to compete with the top 10% of manufacturers globally in performance.

We’ve always had the quality. Now we’ve got to that point where we can compete head-on with some of the biggest manufacturers around the world.

Tindo recently posted photos from the factory, which included a couple of Tesla Model 3s. As the transition to electric cars continues, solar companies have a massive opportunity in the residential and commercial space, to capture the energy from the sun and power the vehicles of tomorrow.

Renewables help reduce our emissions and achieve objectives to reduce carbon emission. South Australia is committed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by more than 50% below 2005 levels before 2030 and achieve net zero emissions by 2050.

Producing and deploying solar panels seems like a pretty good path to help with that mission.

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Renewables

Creator of techAU, Jason has spent the dozen+ years covering technology in Australia and around the world. Bringing a background in multimedia and passion for technology to the job, Cartwright delivers detailed product reviews, event coverage and industry news on a daily basis. Disclaimer: Tesla Shareholder from 20/01/2021
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