University of Technology Sydney’s QSI, releases quantum programming environment

Grab your coffee, you’ll need it for this one. The University of Technology Sydney’s Quantum Software and Information (QSI) has released qcompiler.com, providing universal access to a new quantum programming environment....

Grab your coffee, you’ll need it for this one. The University of Technology Sydney’s Quantum Software and Information (QSI) has released qcompiler.com, providing universal access to a new quantum programming environment.

QSI is Australia’s leading quantum software research centre, is assisting the quantum community with a resource to solve complex control problems and provide structures, and extend the power of classical computing.

Research Director at QSI, Professor Mingsheng Ying said,

“As we approach the era of quantum computing, software will play a key role in exploiting quantum computing power.

Quantum software requires specific programming methodologies and technologies to harness the potential and advantages it can offer and the quantum software market will be much larger than the quantum hardware market,”

The programming environment – named Q|SI> (sexy right) after the Centre. It uses a very powerful and high-level imperative programming language, quantum while, developed for quantum computers by Professor Ying.

The QSI platform includes a quantum simulator for quantum circuits and quantum program analysis and verification toolkits. It can be used to simulate quantum algorithms, analyse the termination and average running time of quantum programs, and verify program correctness. There are two modes: ‘running-time execution’ which simulates quantum behaviours and compile for real quantum computer; and ‘static execution’ designed for analysis and verification.

Two unique features of Q|SI> are:

  • A quantum program analyser which uses algorithms for termination analysis and for computing the average running time of quantum programs
  • A quantum program verifier establishes a logic, written in quantum- while, which reasons about the correctness of quantum programs.

The core of the platform is the compiler which can be used to bridge classical computer and quantum computer and thus the website is named after this component. The installation package can be downloaded to a standard computer and, following a set of instructions and networks protocols, the user learns about programming, structure and algorithms.

If you’re still confused, then check out the video below for more information.

This unique platform is accessible at all levels, from expert to beginner, says its architect, QSI Ph.D. candidate Shusen Liu, but is primarily a resource for

  • scientists seeking verification of research into quantum concepts and principles and needing tools for verification and research results
  • computer engineers wanting advanced tools which implement algorithms and programs developed by the quantum community with greater speeds, without the need to acquire theoretical knowledge of quantum physics
  • education institutes where students need tools to support and verify course work.

Professor Ying went on to say,

“Quantum computing has the potential to be truly transformational not just in engineering and computer science, but fields such as medicine and life sciences.  This new resource allows scientists, academic and industry researchers and developers to advance insight into the applications of quantum software,”

“We believe that quantum programming is not only about the language, translation or execution, but also about the opportunity of implementation within the classical computer.”

A video introducing the environment is available on the QSI website at: qsi.uts.edu.au

UTS:QSI has 5 research programs:

  • algorithms and complexity,
  • AI applications,
  • programming and verification,
  • intermediate quantum computing and architectures
  • information theory and security.

The UTS:QSI will be playing a major role in developing applications for the Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technologies.

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Creator of techAU, Jason has spent the dozen+ years covering technology in Australia and around the world. Bringing a background in multimedia and passion for technology to the job, Cartwright delivers detailed product reviews, event coverage and industry news on a daily basis.
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